Concussions in high school athletes may be a risk factor for suicide

Concussion, the most common form of traumatic brain injury, has been linked to an increased risk of depression and suicide in adults. Now new research published by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) suggests high school students with a history of sports-related concussions might be at an increased risk for suicide completion. The research, which recently […]

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Environmental enrichment corrects errors in brain development

Environmental enrichment can partially correct miswired neurons in the visual pathway, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro. During normal development, neurons exit the retina and form connections in specific area of the lateral geniculate nucleus, a part of the brain involved in visual processing. In mice with a genetic mutation, the neurons land throughout the entire lateral […]

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Cells study helping to crack the code to Alzheimer’s disease

A study led by researchers at Monash University has opened up new hope for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in older people and, as there are no effective treatments, is one of the leading contributors to the global disease burden. Various genes have been implicated in the changes that happen in […]

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New research identifies neurodevelopment-related gene deficiency

Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have identified that a gene critical to clearing up unnecessary proteins plays a role in brain development and contributes to the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. The discovery, published today in Neuron, provides important insight into the mechanism of both diseases—a possible step toward finding how to […]

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For cancer patients, Nobel research is far more than prize-worthy

When Shaun Tierney was diagnosed with an aggressive form of kidney cancer in 2007, the prognosis was grim. Twelve years on, the 64-year-old is still living an active life, and even participating in marathon walks for cancer research—an outcome made possible by work that was awarded this year’s Nobel prize in medicine. Tierney’s case is a telling illustration of how […]

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Treatment beneficial for nonagenarians with lung cancer

(HealthDay)—Receiving treatment is associated with better survival for nonagenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with the greatest survival benefit for stage I patients, according to a study published online Nov. 18 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. Chi-Fu Jeffrey Yang, M.D., from the Stanford University Medical Center in California, and colleagues examined treatment and overall survival among patients aged […]

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Discovery paves the way for blocking malaria transmission in Brazil

The bacteria that form the gut microbiota influence important processes of the human body, such as digestion, nutrient absorption, and defense against pathogens. The same type of relationship is present in most animals, including in the Anhopheles darlingi mosquito, the main vector of malaria in Brazil. In the case of this insect, the composition of the gut microbiota appears to […]

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First-in-human imaging study shows improved heart attack prediction

Doctors need better ways to detect and monitor heart disease, the leading cause of death in industrialized countries. A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers with support from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) has developed an improved optical imaging technique that found differences between potentially life-threatening coronary plaques and those posing less imminent danger for […]

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How much sunshine causes melanoma? It’s in your genes

Australian researchers from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have shown that 22 different genes help to determine how much sun exposure a person needs to receive before developing melanoma. For people at high genetic risk, sun exposure in childhood is a strong contributing factor while people at low genetic risk develop melanoma only after a lifetime of exposure to sunlight. […]

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